Who Gets the Credit on Your Team?

How to Create a Team Culture by Creating a Team Environment

Harry Truman said, “It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.” If it’s all about you, then you won’t get much done. But if you are willing to share the credit with others, then you will end up getting a lot done.

credit

People want to be part of something larger than themselves. When they feel like they are contributing and seeing progress, then they are more likely to want to stay at it. But a leader who doesn’t see the team’s need to be recognized will lose their team very quickly.

Here are three things to implement a team culture by focusing on giving credit to others on the team.

Speaking at Outcomes Conference Today!

Today I am in Dallas, preparing to share insights from my #1 bestseller, Dear Boss: What Your Employees Wish You Knew, with senior HR leaders at the Christian Leadership Alliance Outcomes Conference.

Based on the research I conducted for my book, four themes emerged that encapsulate the problems voiced by employees and faced by management all over the country. Your workplace likely needs you to be a culture pioneer.

As a leader, you are the catalyst for the change you want to see in your team. You cannot expect that your team will do what you want them to do on their own. They will want to see your Active Leadership to show them how.

To learn more about Active Leadership, check out my #1 bestseller, Dear Boss: What Your Employees Wish You Knew.

How to Have the Perspective to Guide Your Business

Leadership Starts with Seeing Clearly

Leadership starts with understanding your starting point and your ending point. By having a proper perspective, you can chart your course. Otherwise, you will end up like Alice taking directions from the Cheshire Cat in Lewis Carroll’s classic Alice in Wonderland.

perspective

Too many business leaders set their course like the way Alice asked for guidance from the Cheshire Cat.

“Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?”
“That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,” said the Cat.
“I don’t much care where—” said Alice.
“Then it doesn’t matter which way you go,” said the Cat.

In effect, the Cheshire Cat says that if you don’t know where you’re going, then any road will get you there. And too many businesses function in that environment.

If you don’t have a good perspective of where you are and you are going, then you won’t be able to get there. While that sounds obvious, too many businesses don’t have a process for getting to where they want to go.

Here’s a three-step process to determine the perspective needed for seeing clearly enough to chart the course for your business.

The Road to True Success is Lonely

Most Don’t Want to Do What True Success Requires

True success in the workplace doesn’t look like what most people expect it to look like. They think it means occupying the corner office. Having lots of money. Being a powerful individual. But that’s not true success looks like.

True Success

Jesus said that the Son of Man came to serve, not to be served (Matthew 20:28; Mark 10:45). That model of leadership applies not only to the realm of faith, but also to the realm of business.

Here’s what true success looks like in the workplace.

Read my Spring 2018 Outcomes Magazine article

For those who work for you, living the Golden Rule can make a huge impact in their lives. You can put the Golden Rule (Matt. 7:12) into action and produce a transformational culture. As a result, your organization will have a triple bottom-line impact.

Read my article, “Seeing the Light,” in the Spring 2018 issue of Outcomes Magazine.

I will be sharing this insight with the senior HR leaders at the Outcomes Conference 2018 in Dallas next week.

I hope you enjoy the article, and I hope I see you in Dallas next week!

Not Seeing Clearly Causes Dangerous Consequences

Three Unclear Situations to Watch Out for

The drive home from celebrating Christmas 23 ago was forever etched into my mind. My wife and I had gone to celebrate the holiday with her side of the family in the Shenandoah Valley. We had a great time of opening presents, eating good food, and laughing a lot. We knew we had a two-hour drive back to Northern Virginia ahead of us, but that was before the snow started falling. When we finally got on the highway, the snow was coming down so hard that we could barely see what was right in front of us. Drivers who were not seeing clearly that night spun around in the middle of the road or got stuck in the median. And not seeing clearly that night made our two hour drive into a much longer, white-knuckled experience that I haven’t forgotten 23 years later.

not seeing clearly

You will find that not seeing clearly in your life can have dangerous consequences. If you don’t see things clearly or accurately, you will draw incorrect conclusions based on what you think you see.

Here are three unclear situations to watch out for.

Are You OK With Uncomfortable Conversations?

Your interpersonal success depends on having those awkward moments

Which conversations do you dread? Are they with an employee or colleague who doesn’t seem to do what they should? Are they the ones with your teenager about what they do or don’t do? Are they with your spouse over who’s going to get their way? Your ability to have success in your interpersonal relations will be as a result of having uncomfortable conversations.

uncomfortable conversations

No one wants to have to talk about that stuff. And yet that’s how you are able to make the relationship progress to becoming better than it is now. But it requires that you persevere through those uncomfortable conversations.

Here are three levels to which your workplace and personal relationships will improve as a result of having uncomfortable conversations.

Listen online to my newest archived 60-second commentary Starting Over on the Intentional Living Minute as their Leadership Coach and content contributor for the Intentional Living Center.

Appearance: Intentional Living Minute – Starting Over
Format: Radio

Read my Creating Culture post on CLA’s Higher Thinking blog

Your workplace likely needs you to be a culture pioneer. Creating culture will require intentionality of design and consistency of implementation over a prolonged period of time. You will find a template to design cultural change at your workplace using a strategy composed of four actions.

Read my newest post on CLA’s Higher Thinking blog, “The Four Steps to Creating Culture.”

I will be sharing this insight with the senior leaders of human resource divisions at the Outcomes Conference 2018. To learn more about the Chief Human Resource Officer (CHRO) Forum, follow this LINK. Be sure to register as soon as possible as the seats are limited for this Forum.

A Leader’s Default Answer Must Be “No”

Leaders Should Not Say “Yes” Too Often

I have a relative whose job at one time was to find all the problems with all the big equipment the company was trying to design. In effect, he had to expose all the design flaws in what the designers were trying to build and show why it would not work. From an economic perspective, it was important for him to find why it wouldn’t work out before they would actually start building it. From a safety perspective, it was important for them not to create something that would end up malfunctioning. As a result of faithfully doing his job, he got tagged with the nickname of “Dr. No” because of his default answer.

default answer

As a leader, you are tugged in different directions all the time. Some people want you to do one thing, and others want you to do something else. You are constantly being asked to do things that are outside the scope of your focus. And your default answer must be “no.”

It’s not easy saying “no.” But that’s why you’re the leader. It’s important for you to focus on where you know you need to go. You can’t do what others will suggest most of the time. That’s why you have to be prepared to say “no” most of the time.

There are three reasons why your default answer must be “no.”